Friday, September 15, 2017

Let's get blogging again!


I'm truly sorry for the "radio silence" here over recent months. If you follow me on Instagram (@darlingdi) you'll know I'm still alive and quilting, taking photos, working and spending time with family, friends and my gorgeous labrador, Chester (@chesterthewonderlab). 

If not, I hope I can fill in the gaps for you soon, as I break into a rather breathless and ungainly run in an effort to catch up.

If there's one thing guaranteed to spur me into blogging, it's the opportunity to praise my friends, in this case all the wonderful quilters, past and present, who have been part of St Mark's Quilters. 

Last week marked a rather special anniversary for us. 

It was eight years since the Sunday when did something very unusual for me! I stood up in our church (eek!) and announced to a full congregation, consisting of exactly two quilters (myself and Di B), that we were about to hold a Stitchin' Mission, five weeks of beginner quilt making classes, to be taught by my friend Linda Hungerford


You can read the background here . 

Di B and I (Team Di) had each made sample quilts in the weeks leading up to that Sunday reveal, and had them on display, with a clip board on hand to sign up those keen to be part of our venture.


Something amazing happened!

Two dozen eager beginner quilt makers came forward to learn to make a quilt for the children enrolling at the brand new KU Marcia Burgess Autism Specific Early Learning and Care Centre (these days known as "The Marcia"), many experienced quilters offered to be helpers in the classes, and several other friends made quilts to the specifications required, to add to the number.


Heatwave conditions on the last day of class did nothing to dampen the enthusiasm of these generous-hearted ladies, seen here with the results of their work. 


Linda's infectious enthusiasm had made the 5 week course so much fun that quite a few wanted to continue, and so St Mark's Quilters was born.

Over the intervening years a few quilters have come and gone, but we've retained a core bunch of around 12 to 15 ladies who come from near and far to stitch and share friendships on the second Saturday of the month from Feb to November.

We've broadened our vision and now also make tiny Blankets of Love and humidicrib covers for Royal Prince Alfred Hospital's Newborn Intensive Care Unit.


If you have a little time, you might be interested in clicking on the Pages tabs to see some of the creations of our little group, an estimated 800+ quilts (not all photographed). Not bad for a group that grew from almost nothing!

Di B and I are thankful for Linda's initial boost and teaching, and proud to be part of this diverse but passionate group, whose ages from youngest to oldest range over 60 years.

Before I leave you (but not for long!) I'd like to show you my latest quilt finish for The Marcia. 



I can't claim to have pieced the quilt top, having found it as an "orphan" languishing in our SMQ stash, but it made me smile with the clever fabric choices someone made, and deserved to be finally finished.
I quilted it (in the ditch) and bound it, and here it is, proving that a quilt doesn't have to be complicated to become a potential treasure for a little child.
We don't usually give our community quilts a name, but I thought I'd make an exception this time and call it "Frogs Just Want to Have Fun". 

(Apologies for the Cyndi Lauper ear worm that will probably stay with you all day!)


Sunday, April 16, 2017

My A to Z of Quiltcon Savannah {Part 1}



This morning, as I prepared to ruin a second batch of sugary, buttery pralines in my quest to replicate the delicacies that had me salivating in Savannah (don't worry, I saved them just in time!) my thoughts turned to Quiltcon 2017.

I realised it's been a month since I arrived home, high time I took up the story of my amazing USA holiday where I left off.

If you haven't already done so, and you don't mind a few 'spoilers', you can always pop across to Linda's blog and read on. Unlike her scatty and disorganised friend here, she has conscientiously kept up with her blog posts, already sharing all the fun we had at Quiltcon and beyond.

So here's Part 1 of my A to Z of Quiltcon 2017 highlights!

A is for Awards Ceremony, early on the first day, necessitating a pre-dawn start for our drive from Hilton Head to the Savannah International Convention Centre. As slides of each award winning quilt flashed up on the screen there was much cheering for the winners, but I was most excited for Aussie quilters Katherine (Kat) Jones (@twocatsquilts), winner of Best in Show, and Jess Frost (@elvengardenquilts), winner of 3rd place in Improvisation.

"Scattered" by Jess Frost
B is for "Bling", Kat's stunning Best in Show winner. Measuring just under 100 inches square, it looks like a giant princess cut diamond. Kat paper pieced each of the four segments with an identical pattern, but using different shades of solids to cleverly replicate the subtle play of light on a real diamond. If you think it looks amazing here, believe me, it's breathtaking in real life!

"Bling" by Katherine (Kat) Jones
C is for celebration, something we Aussies do well! At the end of day 1 we were more than happy to raise a glass to Kat (centre in this photo) and Jess (back home in Australia). 
(L to R) Michelle Hickson, Di Jobbins (me), Katherine Jones, Lorena Uriarte and Monique Nugent
C is also for the warm and generous domestic machine quilting diva Christa Watson (@christaquilts), whose book, "The Ultimate Guide to Machine Quilting" (co-authored with Angela Walters), is one of my most valued references.
With Christa Watson
Since we live on different continents, and I may never have the opportunity to take a class with her again, I was super keen to soak up as much knowledge from Christa as I could.

So I attended both her lecture "Quilting on your Home Sewing Machine: Tips and Tricks", and her 3 hour class "Free-Motion Alternatives to Straight Line Quilting".


Her spray basting technique is one I'm definitely planning to try, and I was encouraged when she said she uses the same favourite double-batting combo as I do (cotton on the bottom/wool on the top). Yay! I was doing something right!


In her class she patiently taught us more than two dozen machine quilting designs, starting with drawing out a pattern in our sketchbooks, to machine stitching the design on a pre-prepared quilt sandwich. 

She even allowed us to fondle her quilts and see her work up close, without a white glove in sight!



 I'm in love with Christa's geometric chains, swirls (above) and pearls (below).

Pebbles and jagged stipples (below) 


And switchbacks, pebbles and swirls (below)


D is for domestic machine quilting , the subject of the hands-on class I took with Kathleen Riggins (@kathleenquilts), "A Cheater's Guide to Free Motion". 

With Kathleen Riggins
I may have been overdoing the quilting tuition just a tad, but, having flown more than 15,000km to be here, I was going for the full-immersion domestic machine quilting experience, keen to learn from all my quilting icons! 

I drool over pictures of Kathleen's work on Instagram and I follow her blog, but she's a longarmer, and I only quilt on a "mature-aged" domestic Bernina. So when I saw last year that she was teaching a class at Quiltcon using domestic, sit-down machines I grabbed the opportunity with both hands.


Here are some of my bumbling attempts at swirls and pebbles. Kathleen's class taught me many things, but most importantly the need to practice, practice, practice!

E is for "Every Quilter is a Teacher", the featured lecture by keynote speaker, Angela Walters. While dazzling us with slides of her amazing quilts, she also shared how her husband's grandpa, a quilter, had been her mentor. A warm and charismatic teacher herself, she encouraged us to nurture other quilters along this creative path. 

With Angela Walters (Don't you love that quilted chevron tote of hers!)
And she was happy to pose with this breathless fan-girl. How lovely is that!

More soon ;-)


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Saturday, March 11, 2017

Going to all the places - Charleston

It's time for us to pick up the pace on our road trip, moving right along to beautiful Charleston, South Carolina. On our day here we saw a little of both town (with a horse and carriage guided tour) and country (visiting romantic Magnolia Plantation).

The advantage of a guided tour is that it allows you to see all the highlights, and feeds you the history as you go. However the disadvantage is that there's no time to jot anything down. Consequently this post consists mainly of photos I snapped along the way.

 

Our tour started near the old Charleston City Market, and as we walked through on our way to meet our horse and carriage I couldn't resist photographing these bright wire bowls from Africa. I have one of my own at home, and the workmanship of the women who weave the plastic coated telephone wire into the bowls is amazing.

 

Here is just a sampling of the gracious historic homes we passed by on our tour.

 

 

 These pretty houses are part of what's known as Rainbow Row, for obvious reasons.
 
At the end of the ride we tipped the guide, but when we asked the horse if he'd like a tip too, he said 'Nay!'

 
A short drive out of town took us to the beautiful plantation of Magnolia Gardens. 

 

It was quite a wild garden, with nature only just held I check, but the driveway reminded us so much of the movie Forrest Gump, and live oaks were everywhere, Spanish moss dripping from their branches.

 

Here we saw magnolias blooming, of course, as well as azaleas and camellias.

 

I added another alligator warning sign to my growing collection.

 

And gasped at the stunning reflections on the still waters.

 

This Plantation has been in the grounds of the Drayton family for fifteen generations, and the Rev'd
John Drayton developed the gardens in the 1840s.

The house is interesting, though only a small part of it is original, having succumbed to fire during the Civil War.

 

African slaves worked on what was originally a rice plantation along the Ashley River, and the slave huts where they lived have been preserved.

 

By the late afternoon it was time for us to move on to our next stop, Savannah, but not before taking a look around this quaint little roadside store, the Carolina Cider Company.

 

Yes, we did buy a snack for the onward journey!

 
 

Friday, March 10, 2017

Going to all the places - The Biltmore Estate

The first stop on our road trip to Quiltcon, Savannah was the fabulous Biltmore Estate at Asheville, North Carolina, designed by Richard Morris Hunt, and built by more than 1,000 workers for George Washington Vanderbilt II between 1889 and 1895. 

 
Are we there yet?

The gently winding road through landscaper Frederick Law Olmsted's artfully designed forest was clearly designed to build excitement for visitors to Biltmore, with each tantalizing bend promising, but never quite delivering, a view of the house. 
I wasn't too bothered, though, as it was early morning and we were treated to scenes like this, with the late winter sunshine beaming through the trees.

 

This was to be our first view of Biltmore, from the top of a kind of stone belvedere. It
was reached by climbing up the deep but shallow steps of the 'rampe douce', built this way to accommodate horses and buggies.

 

Below is the view looking behind us, and up the hill.

 
Biltmore is BIG, though apparently Vanderbilt called it his 'little mountain escape'. It's designed to resemble a French chateau, and everything about it showcases its owner's wealth.

 

Unusual architectural features intrigued us, like the gargoyles, and the upward sloping windows in this picture with their similarly inclined shallow balconies.

 

 Once inside, we found that they not only followed the incline of the staircase, but each window had a door giving access to its mini-balcony.

 

 You could get lost in the shrubbery in the ground floor Winter Garden..

 

Becoming the owner of a 250 room house at the tender age of 33 years must have made young George Washington Vanderbilt II quite the eligible bachelor, and just three years later he married 25 year old Edith Stuyvesant Dresser. They had one daughter, Cornelia.

 
The house was designed for lavish entertaining, with a grand dining room with a vaulted ceiling 7 stories high!

 
We were told this room is decorated at Christmas with a 35 foot tall illuminated tree.

The two-storey library was exactly the kind any houseguest would appreciate, especially the likes of writers Edith Wharton and Henry James who are known to have stayed there.

 

 

 The bedrooms upstairs were grand. This one, the Louis XV room, is where Cornelia Vanderbilt and her sons were born, and had a fabulous view across the front lawn and beyond. When we were there the morning sun was streaming in, making it warm and cheery and it was easy to see why it was chosen as the birthing and recuperation room.

 
Biltmore has had plumbed bathrooms and flushing toilets since the beginning, as well as both AC and DC electricity installed. Every mod con, in fact.

 

  Below stairs was just as fascinating as above, just like Downton Abbey. Look at all those gleaming copper saucepans! There was one of the earliest walk-in refrigerators, cavernous storerooms for preserves and other staples, a rotisserie kitchen and a rather grim looking laundry. We also saw where some of the servants slept and dined.

 

Biltmore was one of only a few homes to have its own indoor bowling alley, complete with protective walls jutting out so the hapless servant whose job it was to retrieve the balls and re-set the pins could pop behind and not get accidentally collected by a wayward bowling ball.

 

There was even an indoor swimming pool, complete with underwater lighting and heated with steam. The ropes hanging down in the left of my photo were for less confident swimmers to hold onto.

You'll notice the pool is empty in this picture. This is because it has a leak and doesn't hold water any more. We were told that a few years ago it was filled for a special occasion, only to find that the next morning it had completely drained away!

It must have really been something in its day.

 

Sadly, Biltmore's heyday of hosting house parties and lavishly entertaining lasted only a short time. George Washington Vanderbilt II died unexpectedly in 1914 from complications of appendicitis.

 

But the Biltmore Estate is still in the Vanderbilt family, even though none of them lives here any more It's the largest privately-owned house in the United States, and well worth a visit to see how a wealthy American family lived at the beginning of the 20th century, when no expense was spared!